Posts Tagged ‘composer’

How to install Composer inside WordPress

Sunday, March 26th, 2017 | Programming

WordPress has an ancient and ugly codebase. When you are writing plugins, you often want to make your code less horrible and use Composer to bring in dependencies as normal. How do these things fit together?

The first thing I tried was to create plugin-specific dependencies list. Inside the plugin directory, I created a composer.json> file, then ran the install and uploaded it.

This approach works fines when you only use a dependency once and no other plugin uses the same dependency. However, when I wanted to re-use a library in another plugin I had a problem. If I included it twice it would crash.

Installing Composer globally

The solution I came to was to do a global install of Composer. I created a composer.json file in the root and listed all of the dependencies I needed for my plugins in there.

Then, in each plugin, I checked for the file and included it.

if (file_exists(sprintf('%s/vendor/autoload.php', ABSPATH))) {
    require_once sprintf('%s/vendor/autoload.php', ABSPATH);
    add_filter('the_content', 'simple_related_posts', 30);
} else {
    add_action('admin_notices', function() {
        echo '<div class="notice notice-warning is-dismissible"><p><em>Simple Related Posts</em> plugin requires <strong>Composer</strong>.</p></div>';
    });
}

Drawbacks to this approach

This means plugins are no longer self-contained. You have to install the plugin and add the dependencies to your central composer.json file. That is messy.

With the code above, it does not check if the _correct_ dependencies are there. This is something you could add in. However, given the problem above, it seems like it would require so much manual management anyway that I would know what was going on.

Optimise for performance

If you are using Composer on production, do not forget to optimise the autoloader before uploading your files.

composer dumpautoload -o

Conclusion

Personally, I would rather lose plugins being entirely self-contained and benefit from Composer libraries. This approach works well for me because they are purpose-written plugins for my blog.

However, this approach would not work well if you were publishing your plugins as most WordPress users would not know what was going on.

How we built Rena Men

Monday, October 3rd, 2016 | Programming, Tech

rena-men-september

Recently I launched a new website, Rena Men. It is deployed onto the Heroku platform and does quite a bit of cool stuff, so I thought I would document what I have done here.

Code

It is implemented in PHP, using the Rauma framework. Rauma is a project I developed for Learn Finnish and subsequently open-sourced.

Rena Men is built in several modules. There is a website, a content management system (CMS) and an image server. Because they use common functionality like the entity classes, there is also a shared library which is brought in as a Composer dependency.

The website itself is fairly straight forward. Beyond the PHP, there is only the CSS, pre-processed with SASS, and a tiny amount of JavaScript loaded in with require. The CMS is a bit more complicated, using Babel to transpile the ES6 JavaScript, and styled up with Bootstrap.

Deployment

Each module is deployed onto the Heroku platform. This makes it really easy to do as I can roll out an update just using git push. The code itself is stored in a series of private repos on BitBucket, and the Heroku build process fetches them from there.

In the case of the CMS, it also uses the Node build pack to run a Bower install. Third-party additions such as Bootstrap are pulled in on-the-fly just like we do with Composer dependencies. Heroku does not have SSH key integration for Bitbucket (it does for Github) so I’m using a ready-only account with Basic HTTP auth access.

The database is provided by one of the Heroku app add-ons. The storage is provided by Amazon S3. Heroku is built in AWS, so that fits nicely. We store originals in the file system and then crop them on-demand using the image server.

Delivery

Because cropping images is expensive, the image server originally had a local file cache where it would store each crop. However, as Heroku has an ephemeral file system, you cannot write to it, so I had to turn that off in production.

Instead, we’re using the AWS CloudFront CDN. This was super easy to implement. I just created the settings in AWS, pointed CDN subdomain at AWS and it started working. Like other web proxies, it caches your content based on the headers you send it.

Word Search, a PHP library

Sunday, June 5th, 2016 | News, Programming

Have you ever been working on a PHP project and found yourself thinking “what I really need is a way to quickly and easily drop a word search in to this code”? The answer is almost certainly, no.

However, while working on Learn Finnish I found myself in exactly this situation. Being unable to find a good library, I wrote one and published it on GitHub. It is freely available under the MIT license and registered with Composer:

composer require xmeltrut/WordSearch "^1.0"

All you have to do is pass in some words and it will generate a puzzle. It supports horizontal and vertical words, intersecting words and comes with two alphabets by default: English and Finnish.

If you’re feeling generous, head over to GitHub and star it.

word-search

Wing Commander using Composer

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012 | Programming

Back in July, I wrote about Wing Commander, a little library I had written to draw together the very awesome Flight PHP framework and Mustache.php template library.

Times have changed though and everyone is using Composer now (you are using Composer, right? 😉 ), not to mention that even at the time, Wing Commander was using a slightly dated version of the Mustache library. So I decided it was time for an update.

Said update was then completed in a lunch break (and a bit of an evening too) and is now available, and listed on Packagist, which means you can easily install it via Composer.

{
	"require": {
		"xmeltrut/wing-commander": "dev-master"
	}
}

That is all you need in your Composer configuration file, and it will install Flight, Wing Commander and Mustache – plus, it’s now even easier to use than it was before. Full information can be found in the readme.